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ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFEASP.NET :: Understanding Separation Of Concern in ASP.NET MVC

clock February 22, 2021 06:01 by author Peter

What is Separation of Concern?
Wikipedia says “In computer science, separation of concerns (SoC) is a design principle for separating a computer program into distinct sections, such that each section addresses a separate concern. A concern is a set of information that affects the code of a computer program.”

As said concern is a set of information, in our application concern is known as modules or a set of responsibility, we use this principle to separate application module to manage scalable applications.

You can also think of separation the same as how we use layers in our application as follows:


However we can implement different tiers for databases as well.

The above architecture can be followed in any web or native (desktop) application, in order to use separation of concern.

How separation of concern in ASP.NET

A couple of years ago, Microsoft came up with ASP.NET MVC which is a superset of ASP.NET (now ASP.NET web form). Since before ASP.NET MVC there was Spring (JAVA), Ruby on Rail frameworks and may be others has already implemented MVC architecture.

ASP.NET MVC adds SoC for web (http) and separate Model (business), View(User Interface) and Controller (Processing data to view or vice versa), it gives responsibility to Model, View, Controller as follows :


You may have seen the above diagram in many articles. Herethe model is responsible to handle business logic, don’t get it confused with ViewModel as ViewModel are simple classes in ASP.NET MVC to bind strongly typed views.

Flexibility and its violation of SoC in ASP.NET MVC
As a ASP.NET MVC developer I feel it’s quite flexible to work with MVC as it’s a framework with extensibility as we can implement our own principles if required.

MVC framework uses loose coupling (another form of SoC) for every concern (modules). It’s recommended to use Model for business logic, controller for processing incoming requests and views to display information to end user.

But the actual problem is due to flexibility of ASP.NET MVC and it’s easy to violate these principles.

Examples of violation of MVC principle:

    Using ViewBag or ViewData for passing data from controller to view:
        // contoller  
        public ActionResult Index()   
        {  
                ViewBag.EmployeeData = getEmplyees(x => x.DOB > DateTime.Now);  
            }  
            // view  
        foreach(var employee in ViewBag.EmployeeData)  
        {  
            // using data  
        }  

    Above line of code doesn’t restrict developer, but it violates principle to use ViewModel to display data in view.

    Using business logic in controller:
        Public ActionResult Save(Employee model)  
        {  
            If(ModelState.IsValid)   
            {  
                _dbContext.Employees.Add(model)  
            }  
            Return RedirectToAction(“Success”);  
        }  

    Using above code, its violation of SRP because controller is having database logic to save information.

    Using business logic in view:
        @if(user.Role == ”Admin”)  
        {  
            //  
        }  
        Else   
        {  
            //  
        }  

    Using this we are using business logic in view which is only responsible to display information.

Apart from these, there area lot of code snippets you can find in your ASP.NET MVC project as well as online communities.

Recommendations

Where to put business logic:
It’s recommended to use a Service layer to implement business logic in your application as follows:
    public class EmployeeService   
    {  
        IRepository _employeeRepository;  
        public EmployeeService(IRepository employeeRepository)   
        {  
            this._employeeRepository = employeeRepository;  
        }  
        public IEnumeratble < Employee > GetEmplyee(int id)   
        {  
            return _employeeRepository.FindBy(x => x.ID == id).FirstOrDefault();  
        }…………..  
    }  


Repository pattern is a well known pattern for data access, here is a sample:
    public class Repository < T > : IRepository < T > where T: class   
    {  
        private DbContext Context;  
      
        public Repository(DbContext ctx)   
        {  
            Context = ctx;  
        }  
      
        public virtual IQueryable < T > GetAll()   
        {  
            IQueryable < T > query = Context.Set < T > ().AsQueryable();  
            return query;  
        }  
        public IQueryable < T > FindBy(System.Linq.Expressions.Expression < Func < T, bool >> predicate)   
        {  
            IQueryable < T > query = Context.Set < T > ().Where(predicate);  
            return query;  
        }
      
    }  


Repository can be wrapped with a unit of work to save final changes all together. Here is sample unit of work interface which can be implemented for convenience, however it’s not required.
    public interface IUnitOfWork  
    {  
        IRepository < TEntity > GetRepository < TEntity > () where TEntity: class;  
        void Save();  
    }  


And finally we can inject (using DI) service in controller to use business objects.
    public class EmployeeContoller   
    {  
        IService _employeeService;  
        Public EmployeeContoller(IService employeeService)   
        {  
            _employeeService = employeeService;  
        }…………  
    }  

I hope readers will avoidthe  above mentioned mistakes while working with ASP.NET MVC to deliver scalable applications.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFEASP.NET :: View Without Controller Action in MVC

clock February 19, 2021 12:18 by author Peter

In this quick article you will learn how a view can be rendered without its native Controller Action method.

Why do we need this?
Let's look at the following image.


In the image above, you can see that for each view we have a matching controller action. Each of these actions contains a single line of code. In fact, each of these actions contains exactly the same line of code. And this is completely unnecessary. Imagine what you will do when you have hundreds or thousands of views. Will you create hundreds or thousands of controller actions? Of course not, then how can we fix it?

In the MVC Framework, the controller class includes a method, HandleUnknownAction(), that executes whenever we attempt to invoke an action (or when we request a view that has no matching action method) on a controller that does not exist.


Now we are taking advantage of the HandleUnknownAction() method to render views even when a corresponding controller method does not exist.

In the image above you can see we don't have Post5.cshtml, so when I tried to access the Post5.cshtml view, it shows the following error.


To fix this issue, we can use a simple try-catch block and redirect the user on a PageNotFound view; here's how.


 



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE :: Upload Large Files To MVC / WebAPI Using Partitioning

clock February 8, 2021 09:26 by author Peter

Sending large files to an MVC/Web-API Server can be problematic. This article is about an alternative. The approach used is to break a large file up into small chunks, upload them, then merge them back together on the Server via file transfer by partitioning. The article shows how to send files to an MVC Server from both a webpage using JavaScript, and a Web-form httpClient, and can be implemented using either MVC or Web API.

In my experience, the larger the file you need to upload to a website/API, the bigger the potential problems you encounter. Even when you put the right settings in place, adjust your web.config, make certain you use the right multiplier for maxRequestLength and maxAllowedContentLength and of course don't forget about executionTimeout (eek!), things can still go wrong. Connections can fail when the file is *almost* transferred, servers unexpectedly (Murphy's law) run out of space, etc., the list goes on. The diagram below demonstrates the basic concept discussed in this article.

Background
The concept for this solution is very simple. The attached code works (I have it started in production), and can be improved by you in many ways. For example, for the purposes of this article the original large file is broken into app. 1mb chunks, and uploaded to the server sequentially, one chunk at a time. This could, for example, be made more efficient by threading, and sending chunks in parallel. It could also be made more robust by adding fault tolerance, auto-resume into a rest-api architecture etc. I leave you to implement these features yourself if you need them.

The code consists of two parts - the initial file-split/partitioning into chunks, and the final merge of the chunks back into the original file. I will demonstrate the file-split using both C# in a web-form, and JavaScript, and the file-merge using C# server-side.

File split
The concept of splitting a file is very basic. We transverse the file in a binary stream, from position zero, up to the last byte in the file, copying out chunks of binary data along the way and transferring these. Generally we set an arbitrary (or carefully thought out!) chunk size to extract, and use this as the amount of data to take at a time. Anything left over at the end is the final chunk.

In the example below, a chunk size of 128b is set. For the file shown, this gives us 3 x 128b chunks, and 1 x 32b. In this example there are four file chunks resulting from the split and to transfer to the server.

C# File Split
The accompanying demo "WinFileUpload" is a simple Windows forms application. Its sole function is to demonstrate splitting a sample large file (50 MB) in C#, and using a HTTPClient to post the file to a web-server (in this case, an MVC Server).

For this C# example, I have a class called Utils  that takes some input variables such as maximum file chunk size, temporary folder location, and the name of the file to split. To split the file into chunks, we call the method "SplitFile". SplitFile works its way through the input file and breaks it into separate file chunks. We then upload each file chunk it using "UploadFile".
Utils ut = new Utils();  
ut.FileName = "hs-2004-15-b-full_tif.bmp"; // hard coded for demo  
ut.TempFolder = Path.Combine(CurrentFolder, "Temp");  
ut.MaxFileSizeMB = 1;  
ut.SplitFile();  

foreach (string File in ut.FileParts)  
{  
UploadFile(File);  
}  
MessageBox.Show("Upload complete!");  


The file upload method takes an input file-name, and uses a HTTPClient to upload the file. Note the fact that we are sending MultiPartFormData to carry the payload.
public bool UploadFile(string FileName)  
{  
bool rslt = false;  
using (var client = new HttpClient())  
{  
using (var content = new MultipartFormDataContent())  
{  
 var fileContent = new   ByteArrayContent(System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(FileName));  
 fileContent.Headers.ContentDisposition = new  
     ContentDispositionHeaderValue("attachment")  
       {  
        FileName = Path.GetFileName(FileName)  
       };  
 content.Add(fileContent);  

var requestUri = "http://localhost:8170/Home/UploadFile/";  
    try  
    {  
        var result = client.PostAsync(requestUri, content).Result;  
        rslt = true;  
    }  
    catch (Exception ex)  
    {  
        // log error  
        rslt = false;  
    }  
}  
}  
return rslt;  
}  


So, that's the supporting code out of the way. One of the critical things to be aware of next is the file naming convention that is being used. It consists of the original file-name, plus a code-parsable tail "_part." that will be used server-side to merge the different file chunks back into a single contiguous file again. This is simply the convention I put together - you can change it to your own requirements, just be sure you are consistent with it.

The convention for this example is,
Name = original name + ".part_N.X" (N = file part number, X = total files).

Here is an example of a picture file split into three parts.
MyPictureFile.jpg.part_1.3
MyPictureFile.jpg.part_2.3
MyPictureFile.jpg.part_3.3

It doesn't matter what order the file chunks are sent to the Server. The important thing is that some convention, like the above is used, so that the Server knows (a) what file part it is dealing with and (b) when all parts have been received and can be merged back into one large original file again.

Next, here is the meat of the C# code that scans the file, creating multiple chunk files ready to transfer.
public bool SplitFile()  
{  
bool rslt = false;  
string BaseFileName = Path.GetFileName(FileName);  
// set the size of file chunk we are going to split into  
int BufferChunkSize = MaxFileSizeMB * (1024 * 1024);  
// set a buffer size and an array to store the buffer data as we read it  
const int READBUFFER_SIZE = 1024;  
byte[] FSBuffer = new byte[READBUFFER_SIZE];  
// open the file to read it into chunks  
using (FileStream FS = new FileStream(FileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read))  
{  
// calculate the number of files that will be created  
int TotalFileParts = 0;  
if (FS.Length < BufferChunkSize)  
{  
    TotalFileParts = 1;  
}  
else  
{  
    float PreciseFileParts = ((float)FS.Length / (float)BufferChunkSize);  
    TotalFileParts = (int)Math.Ceiling(PreciseFileParts);  
}  

int FilePartCount = 0;  
// scan through the file, and each time we get enough data to fill a chunk, write out that file  
while (FS.Position < FS.Length)  
{  
    string FilePartName = String.Format("{0}.part_{1}.{2}",  
    BaseFileName, (FilePartCount + 1).ToString(), TotalFileParts.ToString());  
    FilePartName = Path.Combine(TempFolder, FilePartName);  
    FileParts.Add(FilePartName);  
    using (FileStream FilePart = new FileStream(FilePartName, FileMode.Create))  
    {  
        int bytesRemaining = BufferChunkSize;  
        int bytesRead = 0;  
        while (bytesRemaining > 0 && (bytesRead = FS.Read(FSBuffer, 0,  
         Math.Min(bytesRemaining, READBUFFER_SIZE))) > 0)  
        {  
            FilePart.Write(FSBuffer, 0, bytesRead);  
            bytesRemaining -= bytesRead;  
        }  
    }  
  // file written, loop for next chunk  
  FilePartCount++;  
}  

}  
return rslt;  
}  


That's it for the C# client-side - we will see the result and how to handle things server-side later in the article. Next, let's look at how to do the same thing in Javascript, from a web-browser.
JavaScript File Split

NB - The JavaScript code, and the C# Merge code are contained in the attached demo file "MVCServer"

In our browser, we have an input control of type "file", and a button to call a method that initiates the file-split and data transfer.
<input type="file" id="uploadFile" name="file" />  <a class="btn btn-primary" href="#" id="btnUpload">Upload file</a>  

On document ready, we bind to the click event of the button to call the main method.
$(document).ready(function () {  
$('#btnUpload').click(function () {  
UploadFile($('#uploadFile')[0].files);  
}  
)  
});  


Our UploadFile method does the work of splitting the file into chunks, and as in our C# example, passing the chunks off to another method for transfer. The main difference here is that in C#, we created individual files, in our JavaScript example, we are taking the chunks from an array instead.  
function UploadFile(TargetFile)  
{  
// create array to store the buffer chunks  
var FileChunk = [];  
// the file object itself that we will work with  
var file = TargetFile[0];  
// set up other initial vars  
var MaxFileSizeMB = 1;  
var BufferChunkSize = MaxFileSizeMB * (1024 * 1024);  
var ReadBuffer_Size = 1024;  
var FileStreamPos = 0;  
// set the initial chunk length  
var EndPos = BufferChunkSize;  
var Size = file.size;  

// add to the FileChunk array until we get to the end of the file  
while (FileStreamPos < Size)  
{  
// "slice" the file from the starting position/offset, to  the required length  
FileChunk.push(file.slice(FileStreamPos, EndPos));  
FileStreamPos = EndPos; // jump by the amount read  
EndPos = FileStreamPos + BufferChunkSize; // set next chunk length  
}  
// get total number of "files" we will be sending  
var TotalParts = FileChunk.length;  
var PartCount = 0;  
// loop through, pulling the first item from the array each time and sending it  
while (chunk = FileChunk.shift())  
{  
PartCount++;  
// file name convention  
var FilePartName = file.name + ".part_" + PartCount + "." + TotalParts;  
// send the file  
UploadFileChunk(chunk, FilePartName);  
}  
}  


The UploadFileChunk takes the part of the file handed by the previous method, and posts it to the Server in a similar manner to the C# example.
function UploadFileChunk(Chunk, FileName)  
{  
var FD = new FormData();  
FD.append('file', Chunk, FileName);  
$.ajax({  
type: "POST",  
url: 'http://localhost:8170/Home/UploadFile/',  
contentType: false,  
processData: false,  
data: FD  
});  
}  


File merge
NB - The JavaScript code, and the C# Merge code are contained in the attached demo file "MVCServer"

Over on the Server, be that MVC or Web-API, we receive the individual file chunks and need to merge them back together again into the original file.

The first thing we do is put a standard POST handler in place to receive the file chunks being posted up to the Server. This code takes the input stream, and saves it to a temp folder using the file-name created by the client (C# or JavaScript). Once the file is saved, the code then calls the "MergeFile" method which checks if it has enough file chunks available yet to merge the file together. Note that this is simply the method I have used for this article. You may decide to handle the merge trigger differently, for example, running a job on a timer every few minutes, passing off to another process, etc. It should be changed depending on your own required implementation.

[HttpPost]  
public HttpResponseMessage UploadFile()  
{  
foreach (string file in Request.Files)  
{  
var FileDataContent = Request.Files[file];  
if (FileDataContent != null && FileDataContent.ContentLength > 0)  
{  
    // take the input stream, and save it to a temp folder using  
    // the original file.part name posted  
    var stream = FileDataContent.InputStream;  
    var fileName = Path.GetFileName(FileDataContent.FileName);  
    var UploadPath = Server.MapPath("~/App_Data/uploads");  
    Directory.CreateDirectory(UploadPath);  
    string path = Path.Combine(UploadPath, fileName);  
    try  
    {  
        if (System.IO.File.Exists(path))  
            System.IO.File.Delete(path);  
        using (var fileStream = System.IO.File.Create(path))  
        {  
            stream.CopyTo(fileStream);  
        }  
        // Once the file part is saved, see if we have enough to merge it  
        Shared.Utils UT = new Shared.Utils();  
        UT.MergeFile(path);  
    }  
    catch (IOException ex)  
    {  
       // handle  
    }  
}  
}  
return new HttpResponseMessage()  
{  
StatusCode = System.Net.HttpStatusCode.OK,  
Content = new StringContent("File uploaded.")  
};  
}  


Each time we call the MergeFile method, it first checks to see if we have all of the file chunk parts required to merge the original file back together again. It determines this by parsing the file-names. If all files are present, the method sorts them into the correct order, and then appends one to another until the original file that was split, is back together again.
/// <summary>  
/// original name + ".part_N.X" (N = file part number, X = total files)  
/// Objective = enumerate files in folder, look for all matching parts of  
/// split file. If found, merge and return true.  
/// </summary>  
/// <param name="FileName"></param>  
/// <returns></returns>  
public bool MergeFile(string FileName)  
{  
bool rslt = false;  
// parse out the different tokens from the filename according to the convention  
string partToken = ".part_";  
string baseFileName = FileName.Substring(0, FileName.IndexOf(partToken));  
string trailingTokens = FileName.Substring(FileName.IndexOf(partToken) + partToken.Length);  
int FileIndex = 0;  
int FileCount = 0;  
int.TryParse(trailingTokens.Substring(0, trailingTokens.IndexOf(".")), out FileIndex);  
int.TryParse(trailingTokens.Substring(trailingTokens.IndexOf(".") + 1), out FileCount);  
// get a list of all file parts in the temp folder  
string Searchpattern = Path.GetFileName(baseFileName) + partToken + "*";  
string[] FilesList = Directory.GetFiles(Path.GetDirectoryName(FileName), Searchpattern);  
//  merge .. improvement would be to confirm individual parts are there / correctly in  
// sequence, a security check would also be important  
// only proceed if we have received all the file chunks  
if (FilesList.Count() == FileCount)  
{  
// use a singleton to stop overlapping processes  
if (!MergeFileManager.Instance.InUse(baseFileName))  
{  
    MergeFileManager.Instance.AddFile(baseFileName);  
    if (File.Exists(baseFileName))  
        File.Delete(baseFileName);  
    // add each file located to a list so we can get them into  
    // the correct order for rebuilding the file  
    List<SortedFile> MergeList = new List<SortedFile>();  
    foreach (string File in FilesList)  
    {  
        SortedFile sFile = new SortedFile();  
        sFile.FileName = File;  
        baseFileName = File.Substring(0, File.IndexOf(partToken));  
        trailingTokens = File.Substring(File.IndexOf(partToken) + partToken.Length);  
        int.TryParse(trailingTokens.  
           Substring(0, trailingTokens.IndexOf(".")), out FileIndex);  
        sFile.FileOrder = FileIndex;  
        MergeList.Add(sFile);  
    }  
    // sort by the file-part number to ensure we merge back in the correct order  
    var MergeOrder = MergeList.OrderBy(s => s.FileOrder).ToList();  
    using (FileStream FS = new FileStream(baseFileName, FileMode.Create))  
    {  
        // merge each file chunk back into one contiguous file stream  
        foreach (var chunk in MergeOrder)  
        {  
            try  
            {  
                using (FileStream fileChunk =  
                   new FileStream(chunk.FileName, FileMode.Open))  
                {  
                    fileChunk.CopyTo(FS);  
                }  
            }  
            catch (IOException ex)  
            {  
                // handle  
            }  
        }  
    }  
    rslt = true;  
    // unlock the file from singleton  
    MergeFileManager.Instance.RemoveFile(baseFileName);  
}  
}  
return rslt;  
}  


Using the file split on the client-side, and file-merge on the server-side, we now have a very workable solution for uploading large files in a more secure manner than simply sending up in one large block of data.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFEASP.NET :: HTTP Error 404.0 0 Not Found in MVC

clock January 29, 2021 08:32 by author Peter

The Resource you are looking for has been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.
I saw this error today while working on a MVC Web Project, this is a common error we get while running websites and performing any CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) operation. The Stackoverflow forum is full of such queries so I decided to describe the fix here. You might not find it useful for your case but I think the majority of requests can be satisfied.

 
Let me show you an error page image here:


Look at the URL in the above image. The URL is requesting a view/page to edit the record but unfortunately the page is not found. Actually the page/view is already there but the problem is, we are not supplying the correct ID or say index to edit.
In other words we need an URL something like http://localhost:25349/demo/Edit/1 to edit the first record and http://localhost:25349/demo/Edit/2 to edit the second record. Yet in the preceding image we are not supplying the ID.
 
Let's fix it. Open the "Index" view of the "demo" controller and look at the existing code:


Oh! there is a comment instead of the ID parameter, so once you change it, such as in the following:
    <td>  
        @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit", new { id=item.SM_UID }) |  
        @Html.ActionLink("Details", "Details", new { id=item.SM_UID }) |  
        @Html.ActionLink("Delete", "Delete", new { id=item.SM_UID })  
    </td>  


Your application will work fine.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFEASP.NET :: ActionResult In ASP.NET Core MVC

clock January 20, 2021 08:56 by author Peter
This article is an  overview of the use of ActionResult in ASP.Net Core MVC. ASP.NET Core MVC has different types of Action Results. Each action result returns a different format of the output. As a programmer, we need to use different action results to get the expected output. 

What is Action Method in ASP.NET Core MVC?
Actions are the methods in controller class which are responsible for returning the view or Json data. Action will mainly have return type “ActionResult” and it will be invoked from method InvokeAction called by controller. All the public methods inside a controller which respond to the URL are known as Action Methods. When creating an Action Method we must follow these rules. I have divided all the action methods into the following categories:

  1. ActionResult
  2. RedirectActionResult
  3. FileResult
  4. Security

Miscellaneous Action Results

Action Method
Description
IActionResult
Defines a contract that represents the result of an action method.
ActionResult
A default implementation of IActionResult.
ContentResult
Represents a text result.
EmptyResult
Represents an ActionResult that when executed will do nothing.
JsonResult
An action result which formats the given object as JSON.
PartialViewResult
Represents an ActionResult that renders a partial view to the response.
ViewResult
Represents an ActionResult that renders a view to the response.
ViewComponentResult
An IActionResult which renders a view component to the response.

ActionResult
The IActionResult return type is appropriate when multiple ActionResult return types are possible in an action. IActionResult and ActionResult work as a container for other action results, in that IActionResult is an interface and ActionResult is an abstract class that other action results inherit from.

public IActionResult Index()  
{  
      return View();  

ActionResult
ActionResult is the base class of all the result type action method.

public ActionResult About()  
{  
     return View();  

ContentResult
ContentResult represents a text result. The default return type of a ContentResult is string, but it’s not limited to string. We can return any type of response by specifying a MIME type, in the code.

public ContentResult ContentResult()  
{  
      return Content("I am ContentResult");  
}  

EmptyResult
EmptyResult represents an ActionResult that when executed will do nothing. We can use it when we want to return empty result.

public EmptyResult EmptyResult() 
  
      return new EmptyResult();  

JsonResult
JsonResult formats the given object as JSON. JsonResult is use to return JSON-formatted data, it returns JSON regardless of what format is requested through Accept header. There is no content negotiation when we use JsonResult.
public JsonResult JsonResult()  
{  
      var name = "Farhan Ahmed";  
      return Json(new { data=name});  
}  

PartialViewResult
PartialViewResult represents an ActionResult that renders a partial view to the response. PartialViews are essential when it comes to loading a part of page through AJAX, they return raw rendered HTML.


public PartialViewResult PartialViewResult()  
{  
      return PartialView("_PartialView");  
}  

ViewResult
ViewResult represents an ActionResult that renders a view to the response. It is used to render a view to response, we use it when we want to render a simple .cshtml view.

public ViewResult ViewResult()  
{  
      return View("About","Home");  
}  

ViewComponentResult
ViewComponentResult is an IActionResult which renders a view component to the response. We use view component by calling Component.InvokeAsync in the view. We can use it to return HTML form a view component. If we want to reuse our business logic or refresh the HTML parts of the page that are loaded with view component we can do that using view component.

public ViewComponent ViewComponent()  
{  
       return ViewComponent();  

Action results from previous version of ASP.NET MVC that are either renamed or deleted.
  • JavaScriptResult - This action result does not exist anymore we can use ContentResult.
  • FilePathResult - We can use VirtualFileResult or PhysicalFileResult instead of FilePathResult
  • HttpNotFoundResult - We can use NotFoundResult instead HttpNotFoundResult
  • HttpStatusCodeResult - We can use StatusCodeResult instead HttpStatusCodeResult
  • HttpUnauthorizedResult - We can use UnauthorizedResult instead HttpUnauthorizedResult


ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFEASP.NET :: Redirect Action Result in ASP.NET Core MVC

clock January 15, 2021 08:56 by author Peter

This article overviews redirect action results in ASP.NET Core MVC. We will lean all redirect action results step by step with examples.

There are four types of redirect action results in ASP.Net Core MVC. Each one can either return normal redirect or permanent. The return method related to the permanent one is suffixed with the Permanent keyword. You can also return these results with their Permanent property set to true. These action results are:
    RedirectResult
    RedirectToActionResult
    RedirectToRouteResult
    LocalRedirectResult

RedirectResult
RedirectResult is an ActionResult that returns a Found (302), Moved Permanently (301), Temporary Redirect (307), or Permanent Redirect (308) response with a Location header to the supplied URL. It will redirect us to the provided URL, it doesn’t matter if the URL is relative or absolute.
    public RedirectResult MyProfile()  
    {  
       return Redirect("https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/members/farhan-ahmed24");  
    }  
      
    public RedirectResult Profile()  
    {  
       return RedirectPermanent("https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/members/farhan-ahmed24");  
    }  


If we call the RedirectPermanent method, it redirect us permanently. Also as I explained in previous section we don’t need to use these methods to redirect permanently or temporarily, we can just new up an instance of RedirectResult with its Permanent property set to true or false and return that instead.
    return new RedirectResult("/") { Permanent = true};  

RedirectToActionResult

RedirectToActionResult is an ActionResult that returns a Found (302), Moved Permanently (301), Temporary Redirect (307), or Permanent Redirect (308) response with a Location header. It targets a controller action, taking in action name, controller name, and route value.
    public RedirectToActionResult EmployeeList()  
    {  
        return RedirectToAction("Index", "Employees");  
    }  


RedirectToRouteResult
RedirectToRouteResult is an ActionResult that returns a Found (302), Moved Permanently (301), Temporary Redirect (307), or Permanent Redirect (308) response with a Location header. Targets a registered route. It should be used when we want to redirect to a route. It takes a route name, route value and redirect us to that route with the route values provided.
    public RedirectToRouteResult DepartmentList()  
    {  
        return RedirectToRoute(new { action = "Index", controller = "Departments", area="" });  
    }  


LocalRedirectResult

LocalRedirectResult is an ActionResult that returns a Found (302), Moved Permanently (301), Temporary Redirect (307), or Permanent Redirect (308) response with a Location header to the supplied local URL. We should use LocalRedirectResult if we want to make sure that the redirects occur in some context that are local to our site. This action result type takes a string for URL needed for redirect, and a bool flag to tell it if it’s permanent. Under the hood, it checks the URL with the Url.IsLocalUrl("URL") method to see if it’s local. If it redirects us to the address, but if it wasn’t, it will throw an InvalidOperationException. You cannot pass a local URL with an absolute address like this, http://localhost:52513/Home/Index, you’ll get an exception. That’s because the IsLocalUrl method considers a URL like this to not be local, so you must always pass a relative URL in.
    public LocalRedirectResult LocalRedirect()  
    {  
        return LocalRedirect("/Home/Index");  
    }  

    public LocalRedirectResult LocalRedirectActionResult()  
            {  
                var IsHomeIndexLocal = Url.IsLocalUrl("/Home/Index");  
                var isRootLocal = Url.IsLocalUrl("/");  
      
                var isAbsoluteUrlLocal = Url.IsLocalUrl("http://localhost: 52513/Home/Index");  
                return LocalRedirect("/Home/Index");  
            }  

Step 1
Open Visual Studio 2019 and select the ASP.NET Core Web Application template and click Next.
 
Step 2
Name the project FileResultActionsCoreMvc_Demo and click Create.
 
Step 3
Select Web Application (Model-View-Controller), and then select Create. Visual Studio used the default template for the MVC project you just created.
 
Step 4
In Solution Explorer, right-click the wwwroot folder. Select Add > New Folder. Name the folder Files. Add some files to work with them.
 
Complete controller code
    using System;  
    using System.Collections.Generic;  
    using System.Diagnostics;  
    using System.Linq;  
    using System.Threading.Tasks;  
    using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;  
    using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;  
    using RedirectResultActionsCoreMvc_Demo.Models;  
      
    namespace RedirectResultActionsCoreMvc_Demo.Controllers  
    {  
        public class HomeController : Controller  
        {  
            public IActionResult Index()  
            {  
                return View();  
            }  
      
            public RedirectResult MyProfile()  
            {  
                return Redirect("https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/members/farhan-ahmed24");  
            }  
            public RedirectResult Profile()  
            {  
                return RedirectPermanent("https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/members/farhan-ahmed24");  
            }  
      
            public RedirectToActionResult EmployeeList()  
            {  
                return RedirectToAction("Index", "Employees");  
            }  
      
            public RedirectToRouteResult DepartmentList()  
            {  
                return RedirectToRoute(new { action = "Index", controller = "Departments", area="" });  
            }  
      
            public LocalRedirectResult LocalRedirect()  
            {  
                return LocalRedirect("/Home/Index");  
            }  
        }  
    }  


Step 5
Open Index view which is in the views folder under the Home folder. Add the below code in Index view.
 
Index View
    @{  
        ViewData["Title"] = "Home Page";  
    }  
      
    <h3 class="text-uppercase">RedirectResult Action in core mvc</h3>  
    <ul class="list-group list-group-horizontal">  
        <li class="list-group-item"><a asp-action="MyProfile" asp-controller="Home" target="_blank">Redirect Result</a></li>  
        <li class="list-group-item"><a asp-action="EmployeeList" asp-controller="Home" target="_blank">RedirectToActionResult</a></li>  
        <li class="list-group-item"><a asp-action="DepartmentList" asp-controller="Home" target="_blank">RedirectToRouteResult</a></li>  
        <li class="list-group-item"><a asp-action="LocalRedirect" asp-controller="Home" target="_blank">LocalRedirectResultt</a></li>  
    </ul>  

Step 6

Build and run your Project, ctrl+F5



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Learn About Filters In ASP.NET MVC

clock December 30, 2020 12:17 by author Peter

As part of this article, we will learn about ASP.Net MVC filters, their different types and we will create a custom log Action Filter using Visual Studio. So without wasting any time let's start.

What are ASP.Net MVC filters
In an ASP.Net MVC Web application, we have action methods defined in controllers that call from different views. For example, when the user clicks on some button on the view, a request goes to the designated controller and then the corresponding action method. Within this flow, sometimes we want to perform logic either before an action method is called or after an action method runs.
 
To fulfill the above condition ASP.Net MVC provides us filters. Filters are the custom classes that provide us with an option to add pre-action and post-action behavior to controller action methods.
 
ASP.NET MVC framework supports four different types of filters:

  • Authorization filters
  • Action filters
  • Result filters
  • Exception filters

Note
They are executed in the order listed above.
 
Authorization filters
In ASP.NET MVC web application by default, all the action methods of all the controllers can be accessible for all the users (for both authenticated and anonymous users both). For this, if we want to restrict some action methods from anonymous users or we want to allow the action methods only to an authenticated user, then you need to use the Authorization Filter in MVC.
 
The Authorization Filter provides two built-in attributes such as Authorize and AllowAnonymous. We can decorate our action methods with the Authorize attribute which allows access to the only authenticated user and we can use AllowAnonymous attribute to allow some action method to all users.
 
We can also create custom Authorization filters for this we have to implement IAuthenticationFilter interface and have overrides its OnAuthentication() and OnAuthenticationChallenge(). We are going deep into it.
 
Action filters
In the ASP.NET MVC web application, action filters are used to perform some logic before and after action methods. The output cache is one of the built-in action filters which we can use in our action methods.
    [OutputCache(Duration=100)]
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
       return View();
    }

We can also create a custom action filter either by implementing IActionFilter interface and FilterAttribute class or by deriving the ActionFilterAttribute abstract class. As part of this article, I am covering creating a custom action filter using the ActionFilterAttribute abstract class.
 
ActionFilterAttribute includes the following method to override it:
    void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    void OnResultExecuted(ResultExecutedContext filterContext)
    void OnResultExecuting(ResultExecutingContext filterContext)

We will see this in detail below.
 
Result filters
 
In an ASP.NET MVC web application, result filters are used to perform some logic before and after a view result is executed. For example, we might want to modify a view result right before the view is rendered.
 
Exception filters
 
In the ASP.NET MVC web application, we can use an exception filter to handle errors raised by either our controller actions or controller action results. We also can use exception filters to log errors.
 
Creating a Log Action Filter
Open Visual Studio and create a new ASP.NET Web Application

Choose Empty, select “MVC” and then click the OK button.

Add a ‘Filters’ folder and create a new class LogActionFilter.cs under it:
    using System.Diagnostics;  
    using System.Web.Mvc;  
    using System.Web.Routing;  
      
    namespace FiltersMVC.Filters  
    {  
        public class LogActionFilter : ActionFilterAttribute  
      
        {  
            public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)  
            {  
                Log("OnActionExecuting", filterContext.RouteData);  
            }  
      
            public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)  
            {  
                Log("OnActionExecuted", filterContext.RouteData);  
            }  
      
            public override void OnResultExecuting(ResultExecutingContext filterContext)  
            {  
                Log("OnResultExecuting", filterContext.RouteData);  
            }  
      
            public override void OnResultExecuted(ResultExecutedContext filterContext)  
            {  
                Log("OnResultExecuted", filterContext.RouteData);  
            }  
      
      
            private void Log(string methodName, RouteData routeData)  
            {  
                var controllerName = routeData.Values["controller"];  
                var actionName = routeData.Values["action"];  
                var message = $"{methodName} controller:{controllerName} action:{actionName}";  
                Debug.WriteLine(message, "Action Filter Log");  
            }  
        }  
    }  


We overrides OnActionExecuting(), OnActionExecuted(), OnResultExecuting(), and OnResultExecuted() methods all are calling the Log() method. The name of the method and the current route data is passed to the Log() method. The Log() method writes a message to the Visual Studio Output window.
 
Now, add HomeController.cs under the Controllers folder.
    using FiltersMVC.Filters;  
    using System.Web.Mvc;  
      
    namespace FiltersMVC.Controllers  
    {  
        [LogActionFilter]  
        public class HomeController : Controller  
        {  
            // GET: Home  
            public ActionResult Index()  
            {  
                return View();  
            }  
        }  
    }  

After adding the above files our folder structure will look like this:


Now run the application, we can see the results in the “Output” window.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Ajax.ActionLink and Html.ActionLink in MVC

clock December 16, 2020 08:26 by author Peter

In this article, you will learn the use of the Ajax.ActionLink helper and Html.ActionLink. I will compare both to show you how they differ. Okay, let's begin with Html.ActionLink.

Html.ActionLink
Html.ActionLink creates a hyperlink on a view page and the user clicks it to navigate to a new URL. It does not link to a view directly, rather it links to a controller's action. Here are some samples of Html.ActionLink.
 
If you want to navigate to the same controller's action method, use the one given below. Razor is smart enough to assume the first param is link text and the second param is the action method name, if it finds only two parameters.
    @Html.ActionLink("Click here", // <-- Link text  
                     "Index" // <-- Action Method Name  
                     )  

It's rendered HTML: <a href="/">Click here</a>
 
If you want to navigate to a different controller's action method, use the one given below. You can even avoid typing "null" for the route value and htmlArguments. Here also, razor will assume the first param as link text, the second param as the action method name and the third param as the controller name, if it finds three parameters.
    @Html.ActionLink("Click here", // <-- Link text  
                     "About", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     "Home", // <-- Controller Name  
                     null, // <-- Route value  
                     null // <-- htmlArguments  
                     )  


It's rendered HTML: <a href="/Home/About">Click here</a>
 
If you want to navigate to the same controller's action method then use the one given below. Here razor will assume the first param is link text, second param is an action method and the third param is the route value. We can avoid typing "null" for the htmlArgument; that works fine.
    @Html.ActionLink("Edit", // <-- Link text  
                     "Edit", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     new { id=item.CustomerID }, // <-- Route value  
                     null // <-- htmlArguments  
                    )  


It's rendered HTML: <a href="/Home/Edit/187">Edit</a>
 
If you want to navigate to the same controller's action method then use the one given below. Here razor will assume the first param is link text, second param is the action method and the third param is the route value. Instead of typing "null" or avoiding the htmlAttribute, I am using the "class" attribute with "ui-btn" as the name.
    @Html.ActionLink("Edit", // <-- Link text  
                     "Edit", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     new { id=item.CustomerID }, // <-- Route value  
                     new {@class="ui-btn"} // <-- htmlArguments  
                    )  

It's rendered HTML: <a class="ui-btn" href="/Home/Edit/187">Edit</a>
 
What if one wants rendered HTML to be as given below that is an application-specific anonymous attribute:
<a class="ui-btn" data-val="abc" href="/Home/Edit/ANTON">Edit</a>
 
If you try to do it as given below, you will get the error:

The reason is that we can't use an anonymous property/attribute having a dash in the name. Use an underscore instead of a dash and MVC will automatically replace the underscore with a dash in the rendered HTML, here it is:
    @Html.ActionLink("Edit", // <-- Link text  
                     "Edit", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     new { id=item.CustomerID }, // <-- Route arguments  
                     new {@class="ui-btn", data_val="abc"} // <-- htmlArguments  
                    )  

That's how we work around in MVC for any anonymous property.
 
Note: You can notice that Html.ActionLink takes at least two parameters as Html.ActionLink(LinkText, ActionMethod).
 
Ajax.ActionLink

Ajax.ActionLink is much like the Html.ActionLink counterpart, it also creates the hyperlink <a href="">Click here</a> but when the user clicks it and has a JavaScript enabled browser, Ajax.ActionLink sends the asynchronous request instead of navigating to the new URL. With the Ajax.ActionLink we specify what controller's action method is to be invoked and also specify what to do with the response coming back from the action method.
 
Let's create an Ajax.ActionLink helper that will send an asynchronous request to the action method and will update the DOM with the result.
 
Step 1
At first we need an Ajax.ActionLink that will send the async request, so here we go:
    <h2>Customers</h2>  
    @Ajax.ActionLink("Customer from Germany", // <-- Text to display  
                     "Germany", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     new AjaxOptions  
                     {  
                         UpdateTargetId="CustomerList", // <-- DOM element ID to update  
                         InsertionMode = InsertionMode.Replace, // <-- Replace the content of DOM element  
                         HttpMethod = "GET" // <-- HTTP method  
                     })  
    @Ajax.ActionLink("Customer from Mexico", // <-- Text to display  
                     "Mexico", // <-- Action Method Name  
                     new AjaxOptions  
                     {  
                         UpdateTargetId="CustomerList", // <-- DOM element ID to update  
                         InsertionMode = InsertionMode.Replace, // <-- Replace the content of DOM element  
                         HttpMethod = "GET" // <-- HTTP method  
                     })  
    <div id="CustomerList"></div>  
    @section scripts{  
        @Scripts.Render("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.min.js")  
    }  


In the code above, you can see that I have created two Ajax.ActionLinks, one to display the list of customers from Germany and another to display the list of customers from Mexico, all will be called asynchronously. We have not specified which controller to access, so by default it will look in the same controller. Here is the generated HTML by both Ajax.ActionLink.
<a data-ajax="true" data-ajax-method="GET" data-ajax-mode="replace" data-ajax-update="#CustomerList" href="/Home/Germany">Customer from Germany</a>
 
<a data-ajax="true" data-ajax-method="GET" data-ajax-mode="replace" data-ajax-update="#CustomerList" href="/Home/Mexico">Customer from Mexico</a>
 

The unobtrusive jQuery uses the data-ajax prefix for JavaScript to invoke action methods on the server rather than intrusively emitting inline client scripts.
 
When we will click the link it will make a GET HTTP method call and the returned result will be updated to a DOM element by Id "CustomerList".
 
Always remember to place a reference of the jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.js library file after jquery-{version}.js file references, we can use bundling also. If you don't include the jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.js or do it incorrectly, then when you click the link to the view list of countries, an async result will be opened on the new browser tab.
 
Also, ensure that the unobtrusive JavaScript is enabled in your web.config (it should be by default).
    <add key="UnobtrusiveJavaScriptEnabled" value="true" />  

Step 2
Now, let's go ahead and implement the "Germany" and "Mexico" action methods that will return a PartialView.
    NorthwindEntities db = new NorthwindEntities();  
    public PartialViewResult Germany()  
    {  
        var result = from r in db.Customers  
                        where r.Country == "Germany"  
                        select r;  
        return PartialView("_Country", result);  
    }  
    public PartialViewResult Mexico()  
    {  
        var result = from r in db.Customers  
                        where r.Country == "Mexico"  
                        select r;  
        return PartialView("_Country", result);  
    }  


So, in both of the PartialViewResult methods I have used a LINQ query that will filter records on country and then pass the results to a partial view page "_Country.cshtml". I have placed this file in the "Shared" folder so that any view can access it. Let's move on to see the partial view page "_Country.cshtml".
 
Step 3
I made this view page strongly typed by using @model and then iterated through the model data to create a nice tabular format.
    @model IEnumerable<MvcActionLink.Models.Customer>  
    <table>  
        <tr>  
            <th>  
                @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.ContactName)  
            </th>  
            <th>  
                @Html.DisplayNameFor(model => model.Address)  
            </th>  
        </tr>  
    @foreach (var item in Model) {  
        <tr>  
            <td>  
                @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.ContactName)  
            </td>  
            <td>  
                @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.Address)  
            </td>  
        </tr>  
    }  
    </table>  


Now, you all set to run the application.



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Simple Insert And Select Operation Using .NET Core MVC With ADO.NET And Entity Framework Core

clock December 2, 2020 08:53 by author Peter

In this article, I am going to show you guys how to use ADO.NET and Entity framework core in .NET Core MVC. This way you can use either both or on way to implement your application as per your requirements. I attached the project solution which you can refer to. Also, I have shown a repository pattern to complete this project.

Step 1
I have used MS SQLServer for the database.
    USE [CrudDB]  
    GO  
    /****** Object: Table [dbo].[Crud_Data] Script Date: 22-11-2020 09:33:14 ******/  
    SET ANSI_NULLS ON  
    GO  
    SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON  
    GO  
    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Crud_Data](  
    [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,  
    [Name] [varchar](50) NULL,  
    [City] [varchar](50) NULL,  
    [InsertDate] [datetime] NULL,  
    [FatherName] [varchar](50) NULL,  
    CONSTRAINT [PK_Crud_Data] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED  
    (  
    [id] ASC  
    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON, OPTIMIZE_FOR_SEQUENTIAL_KEY = OFF) ON [PRIMARY]  
    ) ON [PRIMARY]  
    GO  


Step-2
Change in the startup.cs file in the project root
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)  
         {  
             services.AddControllersWithViews();  
             //By changing the service reference we are switching to ado.net  to entity framwork core vice versa  
             //----Start  
             services.AddScoped<ICrudRepository, CrudRepository>();  
             //services.AddScoped<ICrudRepository, CrudContextRepository>();  
             //-----End  
             services.AddDbContext<DBAccessContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("MyKey")));  
         }  

Step 3
Connection string in appsettings.json:
    {  
      "Logging": {  
        "LogLevel": {  
          "Default": "Information",  
          "Microsoft": "Warning",  
          "Microsoft.Hosting.Lifetime": "Information"  
        }  
      },  
      "AllowedHosts": "*",  
      "ConnectionStrings": {  
        "MyKey": "Data Source=PRO-ACQER8AM;Initial Catalog=CrudDB;Integrated Security=True;"  
      }  
    }

Step 4
Made model to communicate with View and DB Layer.
    namespace TestDemo.Models  
    {  
        [Table("Crud_Data", Schema = "dbo")]  
        public class CrudModel  
        {  
            public int Id { get; set; }  
            [Required]  
            public string Name { get; set; }  
            [Required]  
            public string City { get; set; }  
      
            public DateTime? InsertDate { get; set; }  
               
            public string? FatherName { get; set; }  
        }  
    } 

Step 5
Controller class CrudController.cs with dependency injection use with helps to lose coupling while switching from ADO.NET to Entity framework and vice-versa.
    public class CrudController : Controller  
       {  
           private readonly ICrudRepository crudRepository;  
           public CrudController(ICrudRepository crudRepository)  
           {  
               this.crudRepository = crudRepository;  
           }  
           public IActionResult Index()  
           {  
               ViewBag.ModelList = crudRepository.GetData();  
               return View();  
           }  
           [HttpPost]  
           public IActionResult Index(CrudModel crudModel)  
           {  
               try  
               {  
                   if (ModelState.IsValid)  
                   {  
                       // ICrudRepository crudRepository = new CrudRepository();  
                       var result = crudRepository.insert(new string[] { crudModel.Name, crudModel.City, System.DateTime.Now.ToString(), crudModel.FatherName });  
                       ViewBag.ModelList = crudRepository.GetData();  
                       if (result)  
                       {  
                           ViewBag.Msg = "Succeed";  
                           ViewBag.alertType = "alert alert-success";  
                       }  
                       else  
                       {  
                           ViewBag.Msg = "Insertion failed";  
                           ViewBag.alertType = "alert alert-danger";  
                       }  
      
                   }  
               }  
               catch (Exception ex)  
               {  
                   ViewBag.Msg = "Insertion failed";  
                   ViewBag.alertType = "alert alert-danger";  
                   ModelState.AddModelError("Message", ex.Message);  
               }  
      
               return View();  
      
           }  
       }

 

Step 6
The project consists of class files for the DB layer and Repository folder and one partial view for showing the detail view.
    We have created an interface in the repository folder to make a service and use both the classes as a service.
    We have created the DBLayer folder and created 2 classes one consists of ado.net insert and select the method and another one for Entity framework Core DBContext.
    In Partial View, I have injected the service directly so that you no need to pass the model to communicate with a partial view. you can check the getdata() method by debugging and uncommenting the specific section over there.
    System.Data.sqlclient reference required to use ado.net, you can add this by using NuGet package manager.

DataAccessDB.cs
    public class DataAccessDB : IDataAccessDB  
       {  
           private readonly IConfiguration config;  
           string connsString = string.Empty;  
           public DataAccessDB(IConfiguration config)  
           {  
               this.config = config;  
               connsString = config.GetConnectionString("MyKey");  
           }  
           public List<CrudModel> GetData()  
           {  
               // string connsString = config.GetConnectionString("MyKey");// "Data Source=PRO-ACQER8AM;Initial Catalog=CrudDB;Integrated Security=True;";  
               List<TestDemo.Models.CrudModel> ModelList = new List<Models.CrudModel>();  
               using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connsString))  
               {  
                   conn.Open();  
                   using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand($"select * from [dbo].[Crud_Data]", conn))  
                   {  
                       try  
                       {  
                           using (var result = command.ExecuteReader())  
                           {  
      
                               while (result.Read())  
                               {  
      
                                   ModelList.Add(  
                                       new Models.CrudModel { Id = (int)result.GetValue("Id"), Name = (string)result.GetValue("Name"), City = (string)result.GetValue("City"),  FatherName = (string)result.GetValue("FatherName").ToString() });  
                               }  
                           }  
                       }  
                       catch (Exception ex)  
                       {  
      
                       }  
                       finally  
                       {  
                           conn.Close();  
                       }  
      
                       return ModelList;  
                   }  
      
      
               }  
           }  
      
             
      
           public bool insert(string[] Param)  
           {  
      
               //   string connsString = config.GetConnectionString("MyKey");// "Data Source=PRO-ACQER8AM;Initial Catalog=CrudDB;Integrated Security=True;";  
      
               using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connsString))  
               {  
                   conn.Open();  
                   using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand($"INSERT INTO [dbo].[Crud_Data] ([Name],[City],[InsertDate],FatherName) VALUES ('{Param[0]}','{Param[1]}',getdate(),'{Param[3]}')", conn))  
                   {  
                       try  
                       {  
                           var result = command.ExecuteNonQuery();  
      
                           if (result > 0)  
                           {  
                               return true;  
                           }  
                       }  
                       catch (Exception)  
                       {  
      
                       }  
                       finally  
                       {  
                           conn.Close();  
                       }  
                       return false;  
                   }  
      
      
               }  
      
           }  
       }  


 DBAccessContext.cs
    public class DBAccessContext:DbContext  
      {  
      
          public DBAccessContext(DbContextOptions<DBAccessContext> options):base(options)  
          {   
          }  
      
          public DbSet<CrudModel> Crud_Data { get; set; }  
      
      }  


CrudRepository.cs
    public class CrudRepository : ICrudRepository  
    {  
        private readonly IConfiguration configuration;  
        private readonly DataAccessDB DB;  
      
        public CrudRepository(IConfiguration configuration)  
        {  
            this.configuration = configuration;  
            this.DB = new DataAccessDB(configuration);   
        }  
        public List<CrudModel> GetData()  
        {  
            return DB.GetData();  
        }  
      
        public bool insert(string[] Param)  
        {  
      
            return DB.insert(Param);  
      
        }  
      
      
    }  

 CrudContextRepository.cs
    public class CrudContextRepository : ICrudRepository  
       {  
           private readonly DBAccessContext dBAccessContext;  
           private readonly IConfiguration configuration;  
      
           public CrudContextRepository(DBAccessContext dBAccessContext,IConfiguration configuration)  
           {  
               this.dBAccessContext = dBAccessContext;  
               this.configuration = configuration;  
           }  
           public  List<CrudModel> GetData()  
           {  
              return dBAccessContext.Crud_Data.ToList();  
           }  
      
           public bool insert(string[] Param)  
           {  
               var model = new CrudModel()  
               {  
                   Name = Param[0],  
                   City = Param[1],  
                   InsertDate = System.DateTime.Now,  
                   FatherName= Param[3]  
      
               };  
               
            dBAccessContext.Crud_Data.Add(model);  
              var result= dBAccessContext.SaveChanges();  
      
               if (result>0)  
               {  
                   return true;  
               }       
               return false;  
           }  
       }  

 ICrudRepository.cs
    public interface ICrudRepository  
      {  
          bool insert(string[] Param);  
          List<TestDemo.Models.CrudModel> GetData();  
      
      }  


 Index.cshtml under View/Crud/
    @model TestDemo.Models.CrudModel  
      
    <partial name="_ValidationScriptsPartial" />  
    <style>  
        .bg-secondary {  
            background-color: #f4f5f7 !important;  
        }  
    </style>  
      
    <h1>Welcome to Crud</h1>  
      
    <form id="Form1" method="post" asp-action="Index" asp-controller="Crud" >  
        @if (ViewBag.Msg != null)  
        {  
      
            <div class="@ViewBag.alertType" role="alert">  
                <div asp-validation-summary="All">@ViewBag.Msg</div>  
            </div>  
            @*<script>  
                    $(function () {  
      
                        $.notify({  
                            title: "<strong>Message:</strong> ",  
                            message: "@ViewBag.Msg"  
                        });  
                    });  
      
                </script>*@  
      
            ViewBag.Msg = null;  
        }  
      
        <div class="card">  
            <div class="card-body">  
                <div class="form-group">  
                    <label asp-for="Name">Name</label>  
                    <input asp-for="Name" class="form-control">  
                    <span asp-validation-for="Name" class="text-danger"></span>  
                </div>  
                <div class="form-group">  
                    <label asp-for="City">City</label>  
                    <input asp-for="City" class="form-control" />  
                    <span asp-validation-for="City" class="text-danger"></span>  
                </div>  
                <div class="form-group">  
                    <label asp-for="FatherName">Father Name</label>  
                    <input asp-for="FatherName" class="form-control" />  
                    <span asp-validation-for="FatherName" class="text-danger"></span>  
                </div>  
            </div>  
            <div class="card-footer">  
                <button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary">Submit</button>  
            </div>  
        </div>  
      
        @{ if (ViewBag.ModelList != null)  
            { <div class="card">  
                    <div class="card-body">  
                        <partial name="_ListPartial" model="@ViewBag.ModelList" />  
                    </div>  
                </div>  
            }}  
      
        @*@await Html.PartialAsync("_ListPartial", Model)*@  
      
        @*@(await Html.RenderComponentAsync<TestDemo.Components.Component>(RenderMode.ServerPrerendered,null))*@  
      
    </form> 



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clock November 24, 2020 08:08 by author Scott

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